An HH-60W Jolly Green II gets hit with 45 mph winds and drenched under 130 gallons-per-minute rain in the McKinley Climatic Lab April 1 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
An HH-60W Jolly Green II gets hit with 45 mph winds and drenched under 130 gallons-per-minute rain in the McKinley Climatic Lab April 1 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
An HH-60W Jolly Green II gets hit with 45 mph winds and drenched under 130 gallons-per-minute rain in the McKinley Climatic Lab April 1 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
An HH-60W Jolly Green II sits in a frozen chamber in the McKinley Climatic Lab March 19 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
An HH-60W Jolly Green II sits in a frozen chamber in the McKinley Climatic Lab March 19 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
An HH-60W Jolly Green II sits under bright lights used to create heat in the McKinley Climatic Lab March 19 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
An HH-60W Jolly Green II sits in a frozen chamber in the McKinley Climatic Lab March 19 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
An HH-60W Jolly Green II sits under bright lights used to create heat in the McKinley Climatic Lab March 19 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
An HH-60W Jolly Green II sits under bright lights used to create heat in the McKinley Climatic Lab March 19 at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Air Force’s new combat search and rescue helicopter and crews experienced temperature extremes from 120 to -60 degrees Fahrenheit as well as torrential rain during the month of testing. The tests evaluate how the aircraft and its instrumentation, electronics and crew fare under the extreme conditions it will face in the operational Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.)
Chris Carr, an AEDC Instrumentation, Data and Controls engineer, demonstrates how the Cross-Domain Solution, or CDS, works Feb. 12, 2020, at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn. The CDS interface was researched as a solution to allow plant operations systems outside of the plant control room to remain unclassified during classified test programs. As part of an AEDC Innovation Grant project, Carr and several AEDC team members worked together to determine whether plant control parameters could be normalized with the addition of a CDS. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Moon) (This image has been altered by obscuring items for security purposes.)
Scott Howard, an AEDC Instrumentation, Data and Controls engineer, sets up the Cross-Domain Solution hardware prior to connecting it to a desktop computer Feb. 12, 2020, at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Moon) (This image has been altered by obscuring items for security purposes.)
On Feb. 12, 2020, Chris Carr, left, and Scott Howard, Instrumentation, Data and Controls engineers at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn., set up the Cross-Domain Solution hardware before connecting it to a desktop computer at Arnold to demonstrate how it is used. The CDS interface was researched as a solution to allow Plant Operations Systems outside of the Plant Control Room to remain unclassified during classified test programs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Moon) (This image has been altered by obscuring items for security purposes)

About AEDC

AEDC shieldArnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC) operates more than 68 aerodynamic and propulsion wind tunnels, rocket and turbine engine test cells, space environmental chambers, arc heaters, ballistic ranges and other specialized units located in eight states. Many of the complex's test units have capabilities unmatched elsewhere in the United States; some are unique in the world. AEDC is one of three installations which are part of the Air Force Test Center (AFTC), one of six subordinate commands of the Air Force Materiel Command organization and an important national resource. View AEDC's fact sheet. View/Read AEDC's Test Facility Guide.

Our Mission: To prove the superiority of systems required to meet the demands of the National Defense Strategy.

Our Vision: Second to none!

ID/CAC/Visitor Badge

The Arnold AFB Visitors' Center is the single point of service for issuance of identification media to include Common Access Cards (CAC), military (including Guard, Reserve or Retiree) and family member ID Cards. The center also produces access badges/cards for entry to AEDC/Arnold AFB.

The Visitors' Control Center and DEERS office operates from 6:30 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. (0630-1700) Monday through Friday. To ensure availability of required services please call (931) 454-5453.

Volunteer Opportunities

Volunteering is such an important part of giving back to the community. Below are volunteer opportunities and resources available to base personnel.

Commander's Action Line

The Commander's Action Line is an integral part of the base feedback network. Always use the proper chain of command to address your concerns; if you are not satisfied with the response or you are unable to resolve the problem or concern, call the Action Line at (931) 454-6000. You may also submit an Action Line ONLY after the member has attempted to make resolution through the appropriate chain through the AEDC Intranet home page.

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A publication for and about Arnold Engineering Development Complex
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RT @MarshaBlackburn: Happy 72nd birthday @usairforce! God bless our Tennessee airmen & women at Arnold Air Force Base @AEDCnews, 119th Com…
RT @WPLN: 50 years ago this week, a spaceship that Tennessee engineers tested touched down on the moon. https://t.co/2LRxuazM0C
RT @StrikeWriter: 10% model of B-1B "Bone" is at Arnold AFB's Arnold Engineering Development Complex for store separation tests in the 16-f…
RT @HQ_AFMC: It's back! The B-1B, aka "The Bone" has returned to @AEDCnews for store separation tests in the transonic wind tunnel. Tests a…
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RT @HQ_AFMC: The @usairforce Lt. Gen. Arnold W. Bunch, Jr. has been nominated by the President for a fourth star to become the next command…
#DYK│ AEDC's Advanced Missile Signature Center is a national asset supporting the MDA, DIA Missile and Space Intell… https://t.co/ABStqVGJi2
RT @AirmanMagazine: Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson, F-35 Heritage Flight Team pilot and commander, performs a vertical climb in an F-35A Lightni…
RT @AFResearchLab: Let's give another round of applause to our eight new #AFResearchLab Fellows being inducted tomorrow night at the Fellow…
RT @HQ_AFMC: Great news for our #enlisted force! https://t.co/lvEAEBFXqA

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AEDC Public Affairs

Base Operator: (931) 454-3000
Frequent Phone Numbers

AEDC Public Affairs
100 Kindel Drive
Suite A-242
Arnold AFB, TN 37389
(931) 454-4204

Public Affairs cannot provide individual phone numbers, nor do they have the ability to transfer phone calls.