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Arnold AFB Fire and Emergency Services conducts live fire training

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel attack a fire using vehicle-mounted nozzles while training March 5, 2020, on aircraft rescue and firefighting techniques at a training area on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel attack a fire using vehicle-mounted nozzles while training March 5, 2020, on aircraft rescue and firefighting techniques at a training area on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

While training, March 5, 2020, on aircraft rescue and firefighting techniques at a training area on base, Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel use aircraft fighting vehicle-mounted nozzles to battle a blaze. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

While training, March 5, 2020, on aircraft rescue and firefighting techniques at a training area on base, Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel use aircraft fighting vehicle-mounted nozzles to battle a blaze. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel use the roof turret on an aircraft firefighting vehicle to battle a blaze while training, March 5, 2020, on aircraft rescue and firefighting techniques at the fire crew’s training area on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel use the roof turret on an aircraft firefighting vehicle to battle a blaze while training, March 5, 2020, on aircraft rescue and firefighting techniques at the fire crew’s training area on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel attack a ground fire near an aircraft with a hand line while training, March 5, 2020, using a propane-fueled trainer brought to the base. The aircraft trainer uses propane to generate controlled fires in various locations in and around the mock fuselage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel attack a ground fire near an aircraft with a hand line while training, March 5, 2020, using a propane-fueled trainer brought to the base. The aircraft trainer uses propane to generate controlled fires in various locations in and around the mock fuselage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel attack an aircraft engine fire with a hand line while training, March 5, 2020, using a propane-fueled trainer brought to the base. The simulator, which was brought in to facilitate training, uses liquid and vapor propane to create controlled and repeatable fire scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel attack an aircraft engine fire with a hand line while training, March 5, 2020, using a propane-fueled trainer brought to the base. The simulator, which was brought in to facilitate training, uses liquid and vapor propane to create controlled and repeatable fire scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel attack an aircraft fire with a hand line as they train, March 5, 2020, on aircraft rescue and firefighting techniques using a propane-fueled trainer brought to the base. The aircraft trainer can simulate fires in multiple locations - cabin, ground, engine, wheel and brake, and the auxiliary power unit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel attack an aircraft fire with a hand line as they train, March 5, 2020, on aircraft rescue and firefighting techniques using a propane-fueled trainer brought to the base. The aircraft trainer can simulate fires in multiple locations - cabin, ground, engine, wheel and brake, and the auxiliary power unit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel enter a live fire trainer Feb. 25, 2020, at Arnold AFB, Tenn. during a training exercise. The trainer is a mobile trailer brought to the base for training. It uses propane for the fuel and simulated smoke, providing a more controllable situation for training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel enter a live fire trainer Feb. 25, 2020, at Arnold AFB, Tenn. during a training exercise. The trainer is a mobile trailer brought to the base for training. It uses propane for the fuel and simulated smoke, providing a more controllable situation for training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

A firefighter stands in a live fire training simulator at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn., Feb. 25, 2020. Propane fuels the fires in the simulator. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

A firefighter stands in a live fire training simulator at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn., Feb. 25, 2020. Propane fuels the fires in the simulator. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Charles Rafferty with the Kentucky State Fire Commission operates the live fire training simulator, Feb. 25, 2020, at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn. Arnold AFB Fire and Emergency Services has worked with the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, which includes the Kentucky State Fire Commission, for the past several years for live fire training using the Commission's simulator. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

Charles Rafferty with the Kentucky State Fire Commission operates the live fire training simulator, Feb. 25, 2020, at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn. Arnold AFB Fire and Emergency Services has worked with the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, which includes the Kentucky State Fire Commission, for the past several years for live fire training using the Commission's simulator. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jill Pickett)

ARNOLD AIR FORCE BASE, Tenn. --

Over the course of two weeks, the Arnold Air Force Base Fire and Emergency Services personnel trained using structure and aircraft live fire simulators.

Live fire training is important for FES team members in order to maintain readiness. The simulators use propane and simulate smoke, which allows crews to quickly reset and cycle team members through repeatable scenarios.