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Family of Wilmer Adam Anderson visits Arnold AFB

Julie Gesell, granddaughter of the late Wilmer Adam Anderson, an AEDC concrete laborer, sketches the name of her grandfather when visiting the memorial outside the Administration and Engineering Building Nov. 16. Anderson was among four AEDC team members who tragically lost their lives in an accident Dec. 17, 1962, at the J-4 liquid rocket test cell. The memorial is dedicated to all individuals who have lost their lives in service to AEDC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Ortiz)

Julie Gesell, granddaughter of the late Wilmer Adam Anderson, an AEDC concrete laborer, sketches the name of her grandfather when visiting the memorial outside the Administration and Engineering Building Nov. 16. Anderson was among four AEDC team members who tragically lost their lives in an accident Dec. 17, 1962, at the J-4 liquid rocket test cell. The memorial is dedicated to all individuals who have lost their lives in service to AEDC. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Ortiz)

The family of the late Wilmer Adam Anderson, an AEDC concrete laborer, visited Arnold Air Force Base on Nov. 16 to see the memorial outside the Administration and Engineering Building that is dedicated to individuals who have lost their lives in service to AEDC. Anderson was among four AEDC team members who tragically lost their lives in an accident Dec. 17, 1962, at the J-4 liquid rocket test cell. Pictured left to right: Chris Warner, operations chief of AEDC Public Affairs; Julie Gesell; Bridgette Boner; Melissa Gesell; Marilyn Anderson Morton; Danny Anderson; and AEDC Commander Col. Cain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Ortiz)

The family of the late Wilmer Adam Anderson, an AEDC concrete laborer, visited Arnold Air Force Base on Nov. 16 to see the memorial outside the Administration and Engineering Building that is dedicated to individuals who have lost their lives in service to AEDC. Anderson was among four AEDC team members who tragically lost their lives in an accident Dec. 17, 1962, at the J-4 liquid rocket test cell. Pictured left to right: Chris Warner, operations chief of AEDC Public Affairs; Julie Gesell; Bridgette Boner; Melissa Gesell; Marilyn Anderson Morton; Danny Anderson; and AEDC Commander Col. Cain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Ortiz)

AEDC Commander Col. Scott Cain speaks to the family of the late Wilmer Adam Anderson, an AEDC concrete laborer, who visited Arnold Air Force Base Nov. 16 to view the memorial dedicated to those who lost their lives in service to Arnold. Cain explained importance of the J-4 crew’s work and how the facility has gone on to play a huge role in the development of today’s missile capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Ortiz)

AEDC Commander Col. Scott Cain speaks to the family of the late Wilmer Adam Anderson, an AEDC concrete laborer, who visited Arnold Air Force Base Nov. 16 to view the memorial dedicated to those who lost their lives in service to Arnold. Cain explained importance of the J-4 crew’s work and how the facility has gone on to play a huge role in the development of today’s missile capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Deidre Ortiz)

ARNOLD AIR FORCE BASE, Tenn. -- The family of the late Wilmer Adam Anderson, an AEDC concrete laborer, visited Arnold Air Force Base to see the memorial outside the Administration and Engineering Building that is dedicated to individuals who have lost their lives in service to AEDC.

Anderson was one of four AEDC team members who tragically lost their lives in an accident on Dec. 17, 1962, at the J-4 liquid rocket test cell.

Three of Anderson’s five children, Marilyn Anderson Morton, Melissa Gesell and Danny Anderson, came to the site Nov. 16 to pay respects to their father and share memories of the time they had together. All were young at the time of their father’s passing, with the eldest being 15 years old. Joining these three were two of Anderson’s grandchildren, Bridgette Boner and Julie Gesell.

AEDC Commander Col. Scott Cain was present for the memorial visit to give his condolences. He also spoke with the family about the importance of the J-4 crew’s work and how the facility has gone on to play a huge role in the development of today’s missile capabilities.